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Tag Archives: anti-inflammatory

Ginger brews; My favorite hot and healthy herb plus an amazing delicious recipe

Ginger is one of my favorite hot herbs. It is fabulously versatile, medicinal and a very popular culinary herb in cuisines across the world. Ginger is hot not only because it is spicy but because in the medicinal world, it is also known to lower inflammation which is a common cause of so many illnesses that we are seeing today.  Ginger is abundant in the phytonutrient gingerol, a natural ingredient that relieves bloating and gas. It also facilitates and promotes healthy digestion while improving bowel function. Ginger acts as an anti-inflammatory by reducing the synthesis of pro-inflammatory (inflammation causing) prostaglandins.

Tip:  ginger can be used on inflamed joints to relieve pain just by placing cold pressed ginger juice in a flannel cloth with some castor oil over the affected joint for 5-10 minutes
It is also rich in essential oils, vitamin B, potassium, manganese, copper and magnesium.
I have used it in my practice with pregnant woman to prevent nausea, in fact for centuries ginger has been used in India, China and other Asian countries as a remedy for nausea.

Ginger can be taken in a capsule, eaten fresh and raw, cooked or brewed as a tea.

TIP: You can cut ginger place two to tsp in boiling water and steep for ten minutes. After cooling, optionally you can add honey, pieces of lemon or orange. When I am sick i will brew with a few cloves of garlic (my other favorite herb)

I also just saw this recipe which I cannot wait to try

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peeled, finely chopped ginger
  • 2 cups purified water
  • raw honey (optional)
  • sparkling water
  • 1 lemon, juiced

Preparation:

Boil 2 cups of water, and add the ginger. Reduce the heat to medium low, and let the mixture simmer for 5 minutes.

Take it off the heat and strain.

When serving, use 1 part of ginger syrup and 3 parts of sparkling water. Serve it on the rocks. Sweeten to taste, using raw honey, or stevia, and add some lemon juice.

from http://www.bestherbalhealth.com

Enjoy !

 
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Posted by on June 4, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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Food as my medicine cabinet? You Betcha!

Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
This is naturally fermented apple cider that has not been pasteurized and still contains probiotics, enzymes and minerals. I am not quoting from the medical literature here but experience which to me is valid. This can help to restore proper ph levels in your body, it’s an immune booster, will help cut a cough and runny nose, as well as flu symptoms, it’s anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal and can be taken daily during the winter months to help fight infections!  It’s also great for yeast infections, skin/intestinal detox, and digestive disorders. Simply mix with raw honey with apple cider vinegar and make apple tea. We use tons of it in flackers as well so enjoy and eat up guilt free.
Ginger:
Yes, good ol fashion just plain ginger root that you can find in the produce department is quite the magical healer! Clinical studies have shown that ginger is helpful for reducing nausea, especially for long car rides, and pregnant ladies.. Simply peel off the tough outer layer and slice off a few inches.  I typically use about an inch of the root and slice it into thin discs and then add then to a hot cup of water.  Allow it to seep for 10-15 minutes and enjoy with some raw honey for a wonderful, soothing and warming tea.

Raw Honey

This is unadulterated honey that has not been heated, changed altered or pasteurized, so it retains all of the natural enzymes and healing properties present from nature. Because of raw honey’s enzymes and minerals and trace amounts of pollen, it makes a fabulous cough suppressant and healing agent.  It is also naturally antimicrobial, which again helps with sore and irritated throats and can also be used on cuts, shallow topical abrasions and boo boos to ward off infection.
1 tsp raw honey
1/4 tsp of cinnamon mixed and yum! great for colds and coughs
Garlic

Garlic contains allicin which has strong antimicrobial effects. I have read can be equivalent to anywhere from 1% to 20% of a standard penicillin dose. It also contains sulphur compounds, this is where much of it’s healing power is, as well as vitamins C and B, flavanoids (antioxidants), and the trace minerals selenium and germanium (excellent for cancer prevention among other things).

The active components in garlic are heat sensitive and fairly volatile, and therefore most of it’s benefit will be lost if the garlic is cooked. Please, by all means, continue to cook with lots of garlic just because it tastes amazing  but for optimal medicinal use, it must be eaten and crushed raw to truly be effective.

Chamomile Tea:

Chamomile is a small, daisy-looking flower that has been used since ancient times to calm the nervous system, relive anxiety and aid in digestion. It is easiest taken as a tea. I like to mix it with peppermint or ginger as a remedy tea wonderful for aiding in digestion. It’s great for calming down little ones too, especially before bed; I know…and your welcome moms (: It can also sometimes work for relieving stress headaches although I also use a dab of lavender oil for these as well.
 
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Posted by on September 17, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Apples dipped in Honey for a sweet & healthy New Year

Today is the Jewish New Year and to celebrate we usually dip apples in honey to ensure that the year is full of good health and sweetness and an abundance in the Fall harvest. Interestingly enough, it’s not just the sweetness of honey that brings forth this wish, it is the medicinal properties of honey as well. This wonderfully rich golden liquid is the miraculous product of honey bees and a naturally delicious alternative to sugar. Although it is available throughout the year, it is an exceptional treat in the summer and fall when it has just been harvested and is at its freshest.

Health benefits, like with any food depends on the quality of the honey

Honey has been used by ancient Egyptians, Assyrians, Chinese, Romans, and Greeks as a medicinal remedy for the management of wounds, skin ailments, and various gastrointestinal diseases.Honey’s therapeutic importance as a known antibacterial agent has been recognized since 1892. In the laboratory, honey has been shown to hamper the growth of food-borne pathogens such as E. coli and salmonella, and to fight certain bacteria, includingStaphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both of which are common in hospitals and doctors’ offices.

Manuka honey is sometimes used to treat chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores. Manuka honey is made in New Zealand from the nectar of Leptospermum scoparium. It’s the basis of Medihoney, which the FDA approved in 2007 for use in treating wounds and skin ulcers. It works very well to stimulate healing.

Drinking tea or warm lemon water mixed with honey is a time-honored way to soothe a sore throat. But honey may be an effective cough suppressant, too.In one study, children age 2 and older with upper respiratory tract infections were given up to 2 teaspoons (10 milliliters) of honey at bedtime. The honey seemed to reduce nighttime coughing and improve sleep. In fact, in the study, honey appeared to be as effective as a common cough suppressant ingredient, dextromethorphan, in typical over-the-counter doses. I like to use a buckwheat honey-based syrup to ease early symptoms of a cold, it calms inflamed membranes and eases the cough. Please note that I do not give children under the age of one year honey because of the risk of botulism

Some laboratory studies suggest honey has the potential also to clear up stuffy noses and ease allergies triggered by pollen. There are lots of minerals and vitamins and antioxidant properties in honey as well — the darker the honey, the higher the level of antioxidants. Bees also make other very valuable healing substances like bee pollen and royal jelly but that’s for another blog.

In the mean time have a slice of apple to celebrate the fall harvest and dip it into some raw organic fresh local honey and wish yourself and those around you a happy healthy and prosperous year!

 
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Posted by on September 4, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Alcohol and Optimal Brain Health?

redwineWe have heard that alcohol consumption is good for you, your heart in particular well what about your brain? Sounds like a true oxymoron, alcohol being good for brain function right? I mean we have all witnessed people ‘on’ too much alcohol and so the immediate effects on the brain are apparent, slowed reflexes, slurred speech, decrease inhibition, decrease balance and inability to really focus…But what about long-term?

The Greeks touted “nothing in excess,” a refrain that still rings true: Low to moderate* alcohol consumption has been associated with numerous potential physiologic benefits with neurologic implications, including improved cholesterol profiles, beneficial effects on platelet and clotting function, and improved insulin sensitivity. Last year we reported that limited alcohol use is associated with a lower risk for dementia[ and that moderate alcohol — especially antioxidant-rich red wine — intake may protect against cerebrovascular disease.A new study published in Circulation Research found that dealcoholized Merlot reduced blood pressure by approximately 6/3 mm Hg in a sample of 67 men at high cardiovascular risk, suggesting that the beneficial effects of wine consumption may not strictly be due to its alcohol content.

The Dr in The Kitchen Warning! Beware that the health costs to the brain of alcohol consumption can quickly outweigh the benefits, as heavy and long-term alcohol use can lead to alcohol abuse and dependence, impair memory function, contribute to neurodegenerative disease, and hinder psychosocial functioning

 
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Posted by on January 27, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Jump Start the New Year; Detox & Anti-inflammatory Magic Brew

Why not jump start the New Year and commit to health and to feeling fabulous right now!

This Magic health brew will give you energy, help your body detoxify and is nourishing as well.  Try it once or even better, enjoy it today, prior to the New Year and jump-start your healthy mission.

Kale, Pineapple, Turmeric and Ginger Detox Drink
This purifying beverage contains kale to nourish the body and cleanse the kidneys; pineapple and turmeric two fabulous anti-inflammatory nutrients, bromelain which also helps to aid digestion; and ginger to help stimulate bile flow in your gall bladder.

Ingredients

1 bunch organic kale de-stemmed (3-4 cups chopped)

1/2 cup fresh pineapple
2 large cucumbers, organic, skins included if possible for the silicon and fiber benefits

1/4 tsp turmeric (the ultminate anti-inflammatory herb)
1/2 lemon, squeezed with a dab of zest

1/4 inch of ginger
1 bunch of mint (1/2 cup) optional but good

If you plan on drinking a lot, add a dropperful  or 30 drops of tincture of milk thistle (my favorite is from Herb Pharm, it is in liquid form, they have a liver tonic/support formula that I adore). This will ensure a happy liver recovery.

Blend and enjoy!

Happy healthy day and year to you all!

 
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Posted by on December 30, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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The happy mood grocery list

This season is challenging for me, dark and getting colder are not any of my favorite things! So anything that I can do to boost my mood, I say sign me up! It turns out that maintaining a healthy diet does more than just improve our physical health. Studies have shown that there is a strong connection between the foods that we eat and our mood.

T’’is the season to eat foods that will also help to boost your mood. Here is how you can do this. “Happy Foods”, as I call them, should be added to your grocery list immediately and become regulars in your kitchen. Here is a list of the few that are my favorites.

Chocolate (you knew this would be number one on my list right?)

A study in the Journal of Pharmacology found that eating a few ounces of dark chocolate per day improved people’s moods. Add to that the combination of the emotional response when eating chocolate – the velvety texture, sweet aroma, and good memories it produces – along with its dash of caffeine and its sugar content, which boosts serotonin levels, and you’ve got one fabulous ‘feel-good food’.

Dark chocolate is best for a few reasons; as you may already know, sugar is a contributing cause of the blues and is typically found in higher content in chocolate as the percentage of cocoa goes down. Cocoa on the other hand is very good for boosting our mood, so the higher the percentage of cocoa the better. The flavonoids found in cocoa and chocolate are full of antioxidants that help to lower blood pressure and improve blood flow to the brain and heart.

Other foods containing flavonoids: cranberries, apples, red wine, peanuts, onions

Flax seeds and Walnuts
A study conducted by researchers at Harvard University and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition revealed that an omega-3 fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) found in flax seeds and walnuts,  alleviates symptoms of depression.

Flax seeds and walnuts contain some of the best sources for omega-3 fatty acids and walnuts have the bonus ingredient uridine, which in combination with each other, help improve communication between the neurons in your brain. This is the same action that some antidepressant drugs perform – just in an edible delicious  natural way!
Other foods containing ALA: soybeans, flackers, hemp seeds, chia seeds

Avocado
Soft, nourishing, and rich, this fruit is surprisingly rich in good fats, protein and fiber. While quite heavy in texture, it is gentle on your stomach, heart healthy, calming to your system, soothing to your skin and joints and creamy delicious. Avocados help to build strength and a healthy immune system.

Avocados contain a wide variety of good healthy fats that can help to increase serotonin levels in the brain. 3 types of phytosterols are also packed into its nutrition profile, contributing to its natural ability to control inflammation. Enjoy with a dab of lime, pinch of salt and cilantro.

Other foods containing healthy fats: olive oil, nuts, and most cold water fishes

Seaweed: Rich in minerals, vitamins, and easily digestible protein, seaweed is almost a perfect food. I love it raw (after I soak it) on my salads or sautéed with garlic and sesame oil. Seaweeds can help keep your thyroid running smoothly and efficiently which is very important for maintain good energy levels and a balanced mood. This nutrient dense food is ideal for nourishing the entire body with a plethora of essential vitamin and minerals that offer the perfect nutrition to help you be energized and feel balanced. If you are frightened by the thought of trying seaweed start with a seaweed salad at any Japanese  store or restaurant. They have mastered the dressing so that the real raw taste is masked in a delicious form that you may enjoy.

Spinach
A study in the Journal of Nutrition showed that people who consumed the lowest levels of folate were 67 percent more likely to suffer from depression than those who took in the most. Popeye was right on with this one. Spinach is rich in folate, another nutrient that helps to boost serotonin levels in the brain. That’s incentive enough to stock up on this nutrient food.
Other foods containing high levels of folate: asparagus, broccoli, and beans

Bananas

A report from researchers at Oxford University found that women recovering from depression who were deficient in tryptophan had a higher chance of regressing back to depressive states. So if you’re feeling a bit down, grab a banana….Bananas contain the amino acid tryptophan plus vitamin B6, magnesium and potassium which, working together to help the body produce serotonin.

So make eating healthy, eating for energy and a balanced mood a priority today. Start with one or two of these items and enjoy them, experiment with them and most importantly watch the evidence ;  a happy , clear, strong mind and good health.

And the best part, we do not really have to compromise, I mean chocolate is on the list right? Sweet!!!

 
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Posted by on December 17, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Cranberry Kale Pilaf; Superfood your Thanksgiving

I know that it has been a while since I have blogged, so sorry! But I am hoping that this will make up for my absence. here is the perfect, super healthy, delicious, rich in nutrients, high in anti-oxidants ideal addition to your thanksgiving dinner menu.This dish will help to balance out your meal, so that you can eat guilt free this Thanksgiving.

This is the pilaf of all times. I am calling it the super food pilaf; vegetarian, antioxidant-rich, high in protein and fiber and full of tasty healthy natural goodness!.

Fresh cranberries are high in a multitude of cancer-protective nutrients and are also an incredible food for lowering inflammation in our bodies. They contain a unique mix of potent antioxidant; proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, pterostilbene, and Vitamin C. Proanthocyanidins are anti-inflammatory, have been shown to be helpful in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and help to improve immune system function. Resveratrol and pterostilbene are the amazing anti-aging compounds also found in red wine. So eat up and feel great – i happen to be a fan of that combo!

How? Here is the recipe, enjoy and happy holidays!

wild rice; use 1 1/2 cups wild rice per 3 cups water bring to boil then place on low to medium heat for about 40 minutes or until grains are soft and water is all absorbed. Let the rice cool.

2 tablespoons cold pressed organic extra virgin olive oil
1 large red onion, chopped
1 cup fresh organic cranberries
1 large bunch of kale. Use the leaves only if you want your dish to taste sweeter
5 to 6 cups cooked wild rice
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 jalapeno (optional) and 1-2 tablespoons of agave/maple syrup or a dab of stevia (optional)

Heat a deep skillet over medium heat. Add the oil then the onions and sauté until slightly brown and softened. Then add the cranberries and kale; sauté about 5 minutes. Add the cooked wild rice, salt, and pepper; and chopped jalapeno if desire then sauté 5 to 6 more minutes. Stir in sweetener of desire. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary and voila!

 

This recipe originated here;

http://www.nourishingmeals.com/ but was doctored up slightly by me (:

 
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Posted by on November 21, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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