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Scrumptious Pie Crust; healthy, raw & gluten free

With berry and cherry season well on its way I know some of you out there must be making lip-smacking, scrumptious pies. I had a client ask me how to make a crust that is gluten-free and still tasty. I upped the ante: here is one that is gluten-free, raw, incredibly healthy and super delicious!

INGREDIENTS

1.5 cups Almonds Soaked  overnight

1 cup Walnuts Soaked  overnight

Rinse, pat the nuts dry

1 cup Dates, pitted, soaked in water

Dash of Sea Salt

Vanilla extract (optional)

In a food processor or high-speed blender, process all ingredients. You can even toss in a few cinnamon currant flackers for more omega 3’s and extra fiber. Use a tsp or a tbsp of water, if necessary to form dough texture.

 Press into a pie pan or plate and voila! Enjoy….

 
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Posted by on July 30, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Inspired by Kale

 

Kale in my garden

Step aside spinach there is a new green in town! I am speaking about my favorite all time green, my garden growing friend and super healthy crunchy leafy green – the incredible fabulous amazing kale! Kale and its incredible health benefits have actually been around for a long time. Quietly, yes, but believe it or not there was kale before there was kale chips! I have been eating this funky looking vegetable for years and as with many good things, it is hard to keep them under the radar for too long. Eventually their amazing qualities shine bright and this year, it’s kale’s turn to be in the spotlight.

I just had my favorite kale salad, freshly picked from the garden, and I feel super energized with fabulous green power!

So here are the  many reasons I love Kale and you should too!

1. kale is a member of the Brassica family of vegetables, (also include are broccoli, cabbage and brussels sprouts) that have gained quite the reputation as potential cancer-fighting foods. Kale is packed with the organosulfur compounds that may actually help the liver neutralize potentially cancerous substances.

2. Kale is full of beta-carotene, an important nutrient for good vision also the prevention of cataracts.

3. Kale is also an excellent source of vitamin C, just one cup will give you 88% of your RDA of vitamin C which is great for your immune system and helpful for protection against viruses like the common cold as well as the flu.

4. Kale is rich in minerals, such as iron, manganese, calcium and potassium. Potassium is excellent to help reduce blood pressure. Calcium is needed for optimal bone integrity.

5. A cup of kale provides 10.4% of the daily value for fiber, which has been shown to reduce high cholesterol levels. Fiber can also help out by keeping blood sugar levels under control, so kale is an excellent vegetable for people with diabetes.

Need I say more?

Recipes:

Really easy- if you are super busy, just buy your favorite pesto (made with olive oil of course) or make your own and take the leaves off of the kale stem, compost the stem and puree the leaves with the pesto. Now you have this enriched delicious guilt free pesto..yum. Try it on your favorite cracker or a flacker, it is really divine….

Easy and cooked- sauté kale 1-2 cups (take the leafy part of the stem and toss the stem. The leafy part is the sweetest and most tender) with fresh garlic (1-2 cloves) and a little water (or extra virgin olive oil) then sprinkle with lemon juice, sea salt and/or olive oil before serving.

Easy and raw- Again take the leaves of the kale (2 cups is perfect) and place in a bowl. Add a tbsp of extra virgin olive oil, a tsp of sea salt and 2 tbsp of lemon juice then using your hands crunch up the leaves so they get soft (the salt helps to breakdown the cell walls of the kale which makes it softer and sweeter and more delicious). May add 1 cup of mushrooms and/or red onions, walnuts to get some omega-3 fatty acids and then let it marinate a little, maybe an hour then enjoy.

 
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Posted by on July 11, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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The life and times of a flacker…

Yesterday, Donn and I explored my garden plants and here is what we found….amazing!

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It all began one cool day a few months ago as I was cleaning up my kitchen and found a container of sample flackers that was ? days or months old. Since I am a composter, I figured why throw them away, some critter out there may be hungry for a flacker and so I threw the whole box into the garden. It rained for a few days after that and when the sun finally came out, behold the flackers were sprouting in my garden!!

 
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Posted by on July 2, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Looks like honey, smells like honey, but it really isn’t honey at all!

Store bought honey makes shocking headlines; looks like honey smells like honey but in fact it ain’t honey at all! Just got word of this shocking information from my wonderful friend and bee keeper extraordinaire. A comprehensive investigation conducted by Food Safety News(FSN) has found that the vast majority of so-called honey more than 75% of products sold at conventional grocery stores, big box stores, drug stores, and restaurants do not contain any pollen, which means they are not real honey.

So what is all this phony honey made of? It is difficult to say for sure, as pollen is the key to verifying that honey is real. According to FSN, much of this imposter honey is more likely being secretly imported from China, and may even be contaminated with antibiotic drugs and other foreign materials.

According to FSN, the lack of pollen in most conventional “honey” products is due to these products having been ultra-filtered. This means that they have been intensely heated, forced through extremely tiny filters, and potentially even watered down or adulterated in some way prior to hitting store shelves.

The good news is that all of the honey products FSN tested from farmers markets, food cooperatives, and “natural” stores were found to contain pollen and a full array of antioxidants and other nutrients. Local beekeepers are another great source of obtaining raw, unprocessed, real honey.

Be sure to read the entire FSN report at:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/

Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/034102_honey_consumer_alert.html#ixzz1sIw4gVUD

 
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Posted by on April 17, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Sprout your own edible seeds this weekend…YUM!

Need a great, easy, fun weekend little project with a high rate of gratification and sensory return? Try sprouting your own sunflower seeds this weekend. It is easy, yummy and in the end a tasty, super healthy treat.

So How To Sprout? Easy!! I soak my seeds overnight, drain them of the water the next day and place in a collander. I keep mine in the collander and water them twice a day until I literally see then sprout, they will look like they have a little tail. Do not keep them in the water, just rinse them twice a day. If you home is warm within a few hours the sprouting process actually begins, the tail, however,may take a few days to form. Then I season them as desired, salt, yeast, smoked paprika or BBQ spicing, or curry, whatever I like on that given day, then place in the dehydrator and 24 hours later, voila! Ready for your palate pleasure.

Just so you know, I love sprouting my seeds and nuts and grains because the health benefits are tremendous and when I then dehydrate them they make super healthy crunchy yummy snacks ideal for those who are on the go but still want high quality easy to eat super nutritious foods.

So why sprout you ask? The process of sprouting or germination fundamentally changes the nutrient composition of any seed. Nutrients such as enzymes, amino acids, and vitamins are substantially increased and become more bioavailable, allowing for better absorption. For example, sprouting doubles the antioxidant (ORAC) value of flaxseeds. The “anti-nutrients” such as phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors and insoluble fibers are decreased, again allowing for increased bioavailability and nutrient absorption. Dehydration then ensures minimal loss of taste and more importantly preservation of these fragile enzyles and nutrients that can be lost with cooking.

 
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Posted by on March 31, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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